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what is color

The color of an object depends on both the physics of the object in its environment and the characteristics of the perceiving eye and brain. It includes the study of the perception of color by the human eye and brain, the origin of color in materials, color theory in art, and the physics of electromagnetic radiation in the visible range (that is, what is commonly referred to simply as light). A viewer's perception of the object's color depends not only on the spectrum of the light leaving its surface, but also on a host of contextual cues, so that color differences between objects can be discerned mostly independent of the lighting spectrum, viewing angle, etc. Most light sources emit light at many different wavelengths; a source's spectrum is a distribution giving its intensity at each wavelength. The perceived color is then further conditioned by the nature of the ambient illumination, and by the color properties of other objects nearby, and via other characteristics of the perceiving eye and brain. This perception of color derives from the stimulation of photoreceptor cells (in particular cone cells in the human eye and other vertebrate eyes) by electromagnetic radiation (in the visible spectrum in the case of humans). Some examples of necessarily non-spectral colors are the achromatic colors (black, gray, and white) and colors such as pink, tan, and magenta. Tristimulus measurement and chromaticity diagrams, Simple excitations, vibrations, and rotations, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy - Color, color - Children's Encyclopedia (Ages 8-11), color - Student Encyclopedia (Ages 11 and up). The photo-receptivity of the "eyes" of other species also varies considerably from that of humans and so results in correspondingly different color perceptions that cannot readily be compared to one another. For color information stored and transferred in digital form, color management techniques, such as those based on ICC profiles, can help to avoid distortions of the reproduced colors. This was studied by Edwin Land in the 1970s and led to his retinex theory of color constancy. This theory was later refined by James Clerk Maxwell and Hermann von Helmholtz. The RGB color space for instance is a color space corresponding to human trichromacy and to the three cone cell types that respond to three bands of light: long wavelengths, peaking near 564–580 nm (red); medium-wavelength, peaking near 534–545 nm (green); and short-wavelength light, near 420–440 nm (blue). If the light is not a pure white source (the case of nearly all forms of artificial lighting), the resulting spectrum will appear a slightly different color. Specifically, it explains why humans cannot perceive a "reddish green" or "yellowish blue", and it predicts the color wheel: it is the collection of colors for which at least one of the two color channels measures a value at one of its extremes. ", Linguistic relativity and the color naming debate, International Commission on Illumination (CIE), https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Color&oldid=974801936, Short description is different from Wikidata, All Wikipedia articles written in American English, Wikipedia pages semi-protected against vandalism, Articles needing additional references from September 2017, All articles needing additional references, Articles with Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy links, Articles with Encyclopædia Britannica links, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. These paler colours are called unsaturated colours. Consultant. The familiar colors of the rainbow in the spectrum—named using the Latin word for appearance or apparition by Isaac Newton in 1671—include all those colors that can be produced by visible light of a single wavelength only, the pure spectral or monochromatic colors. This perception of color derives from the stimulation of photoreceptor cells (in particular cone cells in the human eye and other vertebrate eyes) by electromagnetic radiation (in the visible spectrum in the case of humans). The field of color psychology attempts to identify the effects of color on human emotion and activity. An object that reflects some fraction of impinging light and absorbs the rest may look black but also be faintly reflective; examples are black objects coated with layers of enamel or lacquer. Be on the lookout for your Britannica newsletter to get trusted stories delivered right to your inbox. Honey bees and bumblebees have trichromatic color vision sensitive to ultraviolet but insensitive to red. Other species are sensitive to only two axes of color or do not perceive color at all; these are called dichromats and monochromats respectively. Let us know if you have suggestions to improve this article (requires login). The human eye cannot tell the difference between such light spectra just by looking into the light source, although reflected colors from objects can look different. A useful concept in understanding the perceived color of a non-monochromatic light source is the dominant wavelength, which identifies the single wavelength of light that produces a sensation most similar to the light source. Color management does not circumvent the gamut limitations of particular output devices, but can assist in finding good mapping of input colors into the gamut that can be reproduced. The physiology of colour involves the eye’s and the brain’s responses to light and the sensory data they produce. In physics, colour is associated specifically with electromagnetic radiation of a certain range of wavelengths visible to the human eye. Another problem with color reproduction systems is connected with the acquisition devices, like cameras or scanners. "[10], At the same time as Helmholtz, Ewald Hering developed the opponent process theory of color, noting that color blindness and afterimages typically come in opponent pairs (red-green, blue-orange, yellow-violet, and black-white). Colour, also spelled color, the aspect of any object that may be described in terms of hue, lightness, and saturation. Omissions? Even under identical conditions, the same object may appear red to one observer and orange to another. For each location in the visual field, the three types of cones yield three signals based on the extent to which each is stimulated. This theory has been supported by neurobiology, and accounts for the structure of our subjective color experience. For example, most computer displays reproduce the spectral color orange as a combination of red and green light; it appears orange because the red and green are mixed in the right proportions to allow the eye's cones to respond the way they do to the spectral color orange. While most humans are trichromatic (having three types of color receptors), many animals, known as tetrachromats, have four types. In certain forms of synesthesia/ideasthesia, perceiving letters and numbers (grapheme–color synesthesia) or hearing musical sounds (music–color synesthesia) will lead to the unusual additional experiences of seeing colors. A tone is the result of a specific sound wave, but a colour can be the result of a single light beam or a combination of any number of light beams. Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article. Some color words are derived from the name of an object of that color, such as "orange" or "salmon", while others are abstract, like "red". Updates? Colors vary in several different ways, including hue (shades of red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and violet), saturation, brightness, and gloss. The next colors to be distinguished are usually red and then yellow or green. The wavelengths listed are as measured in air or vacuum (see refractive index). One type, relatively distinct from the other two, is most responsive to light that is perceived as blue or blue-violet, with wavelengths around 450 nm; cones of this type are sometimes called short-wavelength cones or S cones (or misleadingly, blue cones). Colors, their meanings and associations can play major role in works of art, including literature. Although the spectrum of light arriving at the eye from a given direction determines the color sensation in that direction, there are many more possible spectral combinations than color sensations. The response curve as a function of wavelength varies for each type of cone. In normal situations, when light is bright enough to strongly stimulate the cones, rods play virtually no role in vision at all. It has been estimated that humans can distinguish roughly 10 million different colors.[9]. Light of some critical intensity, therefore, is also necessary for colour perception. Color, the aspect of any object that may be described in terms of hue, lightness, and saturation. Opaque objects that specularly reflect light of different wavelengths with different efficiencies look like mirrors tinted with colors determined by those differences. Afterimage effects have also been utilized by artists, including Vincent van Gogh. Color (American English), or colour (Commonwealth English), is the characteristic of visual perception described through color categories, with names such as red, orange, yellow, green, blue, or purple.

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